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Martin Horejsi

Dr. Martin Horejsi is a Professor of Instructional Technology and Science Education at The University of Montana. A long-time meteorite collector and writer, before publishing his column The Accretion Desk in The Meteorite Times, he contributed often and wrote the column From The Strewnfields in Meteorite Magazine. Horejsi is currently a monthly columnist in The Science Teacher, a journal by the National Science Teachers Association.

Horejsi specializes in the collection and study of historic witnessed fall meteorites with the older, smaller, and rarer the better. Although his meteorite collection once numbered over a thousand pieces with near that many different locations, several large trades and sales have streamlined the collection to about 250 locations with all but 10 being important witnessed falls.

Many of the significant specimens in Horejsi's collection are historic witnessed falls that once occupied prominence in the meteorite collections of Robert A. Haag, James Schwade, and Michael Farmer. Other important specimens were acquired through institutional trades including those from The Smithsonian Institution, Arizona State University, and other universities.

Author's Website

Hamlet: An Eye for an Eye. A Satellite for a Stone.

Hamlet: An Eye for an Eye. A Satellite for a Stone.

First, let me say that it’s really great to be here. Frankly, it was getting pretty nip-and-tuck as the fuse on 2012 burned short, but as we all discovered, 2013 arrived on schedule and in like-new condition. So now we can all shift our attention to the next world-ending event. If you are like me […]

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Ochansk: If it’s abundant, it better be good

Ochansk: If it’s abundant, it better be good

An August 1887 Witnessed Fall: Ochansk, Russia Ochansk: If it’s abundant, it better be good.   With 500kg of the brecciated H4 named Ochansk arriving on earth, a collector desiring a piece should focus on collectability and a historical paper trail. In this particular case, the specimen has traveled through at least four documented collections. […]

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An August 1904 Witnessed Fall: Shelburne, Canada A Mud-Slinging Meteorite

An August 1904 Witnessed Fall: Shelburne, Canada A Mud-Slinging Meteorite

An August 1904 Witnessed Fall: Shelburne, Canada A Mud-Slinging Meteorite   The classis L5 look of Shelburne is nothing to write home about, but it does offer plenty of eye candy chondrules for those who take the time to look…closely. The Shelburne chondrite fell back in 1904, and although an exciting event at the time, […]

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Pantar: The Sky is Falling. Really!

Pantar: The Sky is Falling. Really!

Pantar: The Sky is Falling. Really! Lets hope its not a bomb!   Pantar, Philippines is an amazing meteorite. Not for its H5 class, the second most common type of chondrite after the oft-shunned L6. But instead Pantar has several wonderfully detailed descriptions about its 1938 fall and its travel from the island and into […]

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Linum, Germany: It’s What’s For Breakfast!

Linum, Germany: It’s What’s For Breakfast!

Linum, Germany: It’s What’s For Breakfast!   Linum is one of those rare meteorites whose date of fall is within a few years of its TKW in grams. In this case, the Linum fell in 1854 with a total known weight of 1862 grams. Mike Bandli has an excellent description of the fall of Linum, […]

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Lissa: Fell 110 years before Czechoslovakia, and 182 years before the Czech Republic

Lissa: Fell 110 years before Czechoslovakia, and 182 years before the Czech Republic

Lissa is an L6 meteorite that fell in 1808. And that’s a long time ago by any meteorite collecting measurement. I feel fortunate to have a slice in my collection because Lissa fell when the ancestors on my father’s side lived in what was once Bohemia, then Czechoslovakia, and now the Czech Republic.    This […]

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Chantonnay: 200 Years and One Fine Person

Chantonnay: 200 Years and One Fine Person

One hundred years ago this August… a meteorite fell on the small villa of Chantonnay, France. The stone was studied throughout the next two hundred years including under the observant eye of Tschermak who described a fibrous translucent mineral within the matrix. The fibers turned out to be olivine bronzite, a compound that later became […]

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Esnandes, France: Caution Hot!

Esnandes, France: Caution Hot!

Back in the fall of 1837… a  small meteorite fell in Esnandes, France. What makes this small especially interesting is that, and I quote, “A peasant, who observed the fall, said to have been burnt while collecting the stone.” Burnt?  Yet again, someone reported that a meteorite was hot when it landed. Esnandes was a […]

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Friendly Fire from Space: Berlanguillas, Spain

Friendly Fire from Space: Berlanguillas, Spain

Friendly Fire from Space: Berlanguillas, Spain   Berlanguillas fell 200 years ago on July 8, 1811 adding to the earth’s pile of L6 chondrites. But while the classification is not too exciting, the arrival of Berlanguillas did scare soldiers and draw crowds in anticipation of a battle. The following translations were kindly provided by Bernd […]

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Mundrabillia, Australia: Where it all began.

Mundrabillia, Australia: Where it all began.

Where it all began: Mundrabillia, Australia   The etched face of of this 69g end section of Mundrabillia brought joy to its owner, and the touchable wonders of space to hundreds if not thousands of students in its several decades as the cornerstone of my collection. Twenty or so years ago, I bought my first […]

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Accretion Desk: A 100% Vein in a Gao Individual

Accretion Desk: A 100% Vein in a Gao Individual

I like to make up term for describing meteorites such as F2F as in Find to Fall (when an meteorite listed as a find might actually be a fall; or a Toolbox meteorite where the particular specimen was used as a tool of some sort before moving to a higher status in life, and even Meteorites […]

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An October 1902 Witnessed Fall: Crumlin, Northern Ireland

An October 1902 Witnessed Fall: Crumlin, Northern Ireland

An October 1902 Witnessed Fall: Crumlin, Northern Ireland Crumlin: Fame Through a Satirical Cartoon   Like many collectors, I was first introduced to the Crumlin meteorite through the cartoon that appeared in John Burke’s must-read book Cosmic Debris. The caption of the cartoon reads: The British Museum has “Collared” another Irish Treasure…the remarkable meteorite that […]

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September 1997 Witnessed Fall: Worden, Michigan. A “Fender Bender” Meteorite

September 1997 Witnessed Fall: Worden, Michigan. A “Fender Bender” Meteorite

An September 1997 Witnessed Fall: Worden, Michigan USA Worden: A Fender Bender Meteorite   For a five, Worden is filled with superb round chondrules. This 113g complete slice captures the essence of what was once a kilo and a half stone. Meteorites that land on cars deserve a special place in the subcategory of witnessed […]

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Zmenj: Rare Cubed

Zmenj: Rare Cubed

An August 1858 Witnessed Fall: Zmenj, Belarus Zmenj: Rare Cubed   In the classic blending of a howardite, the emerald colored inclusions of diogenite from the asteroidal underworld mingle with the ashen hues of of the eucrite upper class. It’s tough to know where to start describing the collectable rarity of a meteorite such as […]

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Accretion Desk Will Return Next Month

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