Axtell CV3

A 6.2 kg stone was found in 1943 by a man cultivating a cotton field three miles south of Axtell, Texas. The family kept it until 1993 when it was bought by Blaine Reed and distributed. Except for some coloration from terrestrial weathering, it appears very similar to Allende. Close study shows that they are not paired. Axtell belongs to the oxidized-Allende subgroup of CV meteorites (CVoxA).

Dark inclusion in Axtell CV3 thin section containing the altered remains of chondrules, chondrule fragments, CAI and matrix. Incident light. Field of view is 12 mm wide.

Detail of the dark inclusion. Matrix grains are aligned and conform to the contours of the space between chondrules and CAI. Axtell CV3 thin section. Incident light. Field of view is 3 mm wide.

Fragment of radial pyroxene chondrule. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light. Field of view is 3 mm.

Barred olivine chondrule 0.8 mm in diameter. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light.

Complex chondrule 2 mm in diameter. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light.

Granular chondrule 0.6 mm in diameter. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light.

An aggregate containing euhedral olivine grains. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light. Field of view is 0.8 mm

 

 

 

 

Axtell contains both fine-grained and coarse-grained calcium–aluminum-rich inclusions. These five photos are at the same scale with the fields of view 3 mm wide. Axtell CV3 thin section. Cross-polarized light.

About the Author

John Kashuba
John is a natural history enthusiast living in Oregon.
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