IMCA Insights – January 2011

IMCA Insights – January 2011
How it all started – Part 1
by Anne Black & Various IMCA Members

In December 2010 I asked our members for input for our IMCA Insights, and a few questions that would shed light on the different backgrounds of those members who were willing to answer. I asked:

  • How did you become interested by meteorites?
  • Which one was your first one?
  • Which one is your favorite one?
  • And a picture of that meteorite would be nice too.

Here are the first six responses we received, some with pictures, some without. Enjoy!

Twink Monrad

Golden Rule

The Golden Rule Meteorite (Photo courtesy of Twink Monrad)

Q: How did you become interested by meteorites?
A: I became interested in meteorites when my friends Jim Kriegh and John Blennert invited me to help map the Gold Basin strewnfield.

Q: Which one was your first one?
A: My first meteorite was a Gold Basin I found.

Q: Which one is your favorite one?
A: My favorite is the 797 gram L5 Golden Rule I found in the Gold Basin strewnfield (see the photo above).

Twink Monrad
IMCA 9454

Arlene Schlazer

I’ve been a collector since childhood, basically of rocks, minerals, shells and fossils. I was at a Swap Meet of all places, and came upon a booth filled with beautiful amethyst cathedrals, crystals, etc. Of course, I had to have a look. And there on the counter stood a slice of etched metal. I asked what it was, as I had never seen anything quite like it before, and the gentleman said it was a Gibeon meteorite. That was the beginning of my odyssey into the world of meteorites!

What began as a leisurely stroll on a Sunday afternoon has led me in to a community of wonderful people, a collection that encompasses a wide array of beautiful and intriguing cosmic treasures and an unending passion for creating digital art from them. I was instantly intrigued with the idea that it took a 4.5 billion year journey through the cosmos to ultimately land in my living room! I was fascinated that something that old could resemble modern abstract art. And so, that led to my idea for “Art from Out of this World”. Utilizing the underlying patterns, and working with different software programs, my motto still holds…….”The possibilities for creating are as infinite as the stars above that rained these treasures we call meteorites”….. Below are a few photos of before and after…….. enjoy!………

Arlene Schlazer
IMCA 5219

Inspiration for Aurora series

Gibeon Etch Pattern Inspiration for the Aurora series (Photo courtesy of Arlene Schlazer)

Gibeon Aurora LR

Gibeon Aurora LR (Picture courtesy of Arlene Schlazer)

Gibeon Aurora IILR

Gibeon Aurora II LR (Picture courtesy of Arlene Schlazer)

Charley Butterfield

I don’t remember exactly what spurred me to make my first meteorite purchase. My first purchases were a Mundrabilla and a Nantan (bought at the
same time).

It is difficult to say which is my favorite but I guess I would have to say Sikhote-Alin (followed by Brenham and New Concord).

Charley Butterfield
IMCA 6123

Warren Sansoucie

I became interested in meteorites by way of my uncle, an engineer that worked for NASA at the Cape. He always had a nice collection of meteorites and I was hooked the instant I learned what they were.

My first meteorite was one from his collection, a Canyon Diablo (around 60 grams). My favorite meteorite is a NWA unclassified ordinary chondrite. This particular specimen (see the photo below) has a beautiful red-orange and mottled yellow matrix and a moderate amount of metal.

Warren Sansoucie
IMCA 3174

Unclassified NWA Chondrite

Unclassified NWA Chondrite (Photo courtesy of Warren Sansoucie)

Washington S. McCuistian

Q: How did you become interested by meteorites?
A: I’ve always had an affinity for space. Seeing as how I could hold something that travelled through space seemed (and still seems!) fantastic. It’s amazing to think that the history of the solar system, galaxies, and even the universe can be found in the many varied rocks that come to Earth.

Q: Which one was your first one?
A: Tatahouine, approx. 1 gram

Q: Which one is your favorite one?
A: Even though I collect micros, my favorite meteorite is the L4/5 DaG 570 main mass I own. It is approximately 734 grams (see the photo below). My entire family loves it!

Washington S. McCuistian
IMCA 8942

DaG 570, L4/5 Chondrite, Main Mass

DaG 570, L4/5 Chondrite, Main Mass (Photo courtesy of Washington S. McCuistian)

Mike D. Reynolds, Ph.D.

Q: How did you become interested by meteorites?
A: I was interested in astronomy and space since I was 7 years old — some 50 years ago…

Q: Which one was your first one?
Canyon Diablo; I bought a small fragment during a field trip to the Childrens Museum (!!) when I was 9. I spent my milk money on that meteorite; my parents could not understand why I spent money on a meteorite.

Q: Which one is your favorite one?
A: ALL of them!!!

Q: And a picture of that meteorite would be nice too.
A: You do not have enough disc space…

Mike D. Reynolds, Ph.D.
Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Florida State College at Jacksonville
IMCA 1964

Next month we will present you with some more interesting responses by our members – stay tuned, and if you want to share your own story, you know how to reach us.

This article has been compiled and edited by Anne Black and Norbert Classen

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