The Arizona Meteorite Exhibition (2010)

The first-ever LPL event was well-attended. Hopefully there will be more Exhibitions in the future.

In my opinion the first-ever Arizona Meteorite Exhibition was a huge success. It was hosted by, and was the “kick-off” event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson. It brought together Arizona meteorite finders, classifiers, researchers, and collections. The event featured exhibits of Arizona meteorites and meteorite collections, as well as, informative displays, lectures, and posters. The event was held in the Atrium of the Kuiper Space Sciences Building.

Dolores Hill should be congratulated for a large part of the success of this event. She and her colleagues conducted a monumental effort to contact finders and classifiers and collectors of Arizona meteorites, and then to arrange to have these people and their meteorites brought to this event in order to mingle with the LPL researchers and to meet the general public. Just the making of labels and the setting up of the display cases and posters was a laborious task that wasn’t finally completed until just minutes before the doors opened at 6PM (January 30th).


© Robert Verish 2010

Postcard from Exhibition is now a “collectible”

Although this Exhibition was widely publicized before the event (evidenced by how well-attended it was), I found there was only sparse reporting on the Internet after the Exhibition. It may be a result of the Tucson Show following immediately on the heels of the Exhibition. But the few people that did report on the Exhibition did such a fine job of giving a genuine portrayal of the event, that I am going to depart from my usual article layout and, instead, will have my “References:” section immediately precede my image gallery.

I know that, speaking for myself, there was a very short period of transition-time from the Exhibition to the Tucson Show. So short, in fact, that I wasn’t able to pick-up from Dolores Hill the meteorites that I had loaned for the Exhibition display until after the Tucson Show!

By the way, the meteorites from my collection that I loaned for display were:

Bluebird

Franconia – the first one, from which the type specimen was classified.

Gold Basin (L6) – a.k.a.,”Hualapai Wash 010″

Red Dry Lake 002 through 009

Sacramento Wash 002 – from the classified stone (from which the type specimen was obrtained).

Warm Springs Wilderness – an endcut from the classified stone (from which the type specimen was obrtained).

Willcox Playa 002

Willcox Playa 004

Willcox Playa 005

Willcox Playa 006

Willcox Playa 007

Due to time constraints and the size of some of the specimens, not all of my meteorites got to be displayed. The following images are of those specimens that didn’t get to be displayed:

Bluebird (L6):

“Hualapai Wash 010”:

Willcox Playa 004 (L6 S4 W2):

Willcox Playa 005 (H5):

Willcox Playa 006 (H6):

Willcox Playa 007 (L6 S2 W1):

Will there be other Arizona Meteorite Exhibitions in the Future?

I can only hope so. But, I asked Dolores Hill this same question, and she pointed out that this was all part of a 50th anniversary celebration for the LPL and she sincerely hopes that it won’t be another 50 years before the next Exhibition, but she hopes that whoever runs the next event that they have a less arduous job getting it organized. Possibly using another venue, there could be a future Exhibition sooner. Maybe hold it at ASU? But given the rate of increase in the number of AZ meteorite finds being made, we may need to hold the next Exhibition at the Convention Center!

Even if it has to be held elsewhere, I do hope that there will be more Arizona Meteorite Exhibitions in the near future.


References:

Post by “Keith V.” to the Open-Subscriber”

regarding his images about the Arizona Meteorite Exhibition are now uploaded.

Link to the “ArizonaViking” Yahoo-flikr website showing his images from the:
Arizona Meteorite Exhibition – January 30, 2010

One of the display cases at this event.

Link to Rubin Garcia’s YouTube video of the:
2010 Arizona Meteorite Exhibition

Announcement of Arizona Meteorite Exhibition (in a.PDF file) from, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, as posted on Meteorite-Times.com – December 2009.

Appearance of Arizona Meteorite Exhibition in, LPL Calendar, on University of Arizona web site.

Post by “SkyLook123” about Arizona Meteorite Exhibition in Cloudy Nights, Telescope Review, titled “January 30 Kuiper Space Sciences Anniversary Event “.

Bob’s Findings – article titled, Tucson Show 2009, in Meteorite-Times.com – February 2009.

Bob’s Findings – article titled, Willcox Playa 005, WP 006, and WP 007 – Image Gallery, in Meteorite-Times.com – March 2005.



Gallery of Images – Bob’s Findings Article for February 2010

2010 Arizona Meteorite Exhibition


© Robert Verish 2010

The event was held in the Atrium of the Kuiper Space Sciences Building.


© Robert Verish 2010

Arizona Keith did a fine job of recording this event with his digital camera. As you can see in the above image, he was “at the ready” as always.


see image below for close-up

Registration for the Exhibition at the front door.


© Robert Verish 2010

Dick Pugh and Melinda Hutson form Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory (CML), and Dolores Hill (LPL-UA)


see image below for close-up

CML poster presented at the Exhibition


© Robert Verish 2010

Another CML poster presented at the Exhibition



© Robert Verish 2010

Lectures during the Exhibition as part of the LPL Symposium


© Robert Verish 2010

T-shirts with the Map of Arizona Meteorites were on sale.


© Robert Verish 2010

Another poster on display at the Exhibition


© Robert Verish 2010

Arizona meteorites on display!


© Robert Verish 2010

One of many cases of AZ meteorites displayed at the Exhibition


My previous articles can be found *HERE*

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About the Author

Robert Verish
Bob is a retired aerospace engineer living in Southern California, and has been recovering meteorites from the Southwest U.S. Deserts since 1995.
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