Norm Lehrman

Norm Lehrman

Norm Lehrman is a recently retired exploration geologist with over 45 years experience. His career involved fieldwork in over 35 countries on every continent except Antarctica. While stationed in Australia, Norm and his wife, Cookie, became interested in collecting Australites, which ultimately led to a generalized passion for tektites, impactites, meteorites and related materials.

In 1999 they founded the Tektite Source business (www.TektiteSource.com) which has evolved into one of the world's premier providers of tektite and impactite specimens. Norm has retired to a ranch near Spokane, Washington, where they continue to serve tektite aficionados worldwide.

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About Norm Lehrman

Norm Lehrman is a recently retired exploration geologist with over 45 years experience. His career involved fieldwork in over 35 countries on every continent except Antarctica. While stationed in Australia, Norm and his wife, Cookie, became interested in collecting Australites, which ultimately led to a generalized passion for tektites, impactites, meteorites and related materials.

In 1999 they founded the Tektite Source business (www.TektiteSource.com) which has evolved into one of the world's premier providers of tektite and impactite specimens. Norm has retired to a ranch near Spokane, Washington, where they continue to serve tektite aficionados worldwide.

Here are my most recent posts

The Futrell 458.3 gm Hainan Muong Nong: Seventh Sojourn

The Futrell 458.3 gm Hainan Muong Nong: Seventh Sojourn

Seventh attempt to write this piece? Why? The late Darryl Futrell, one of the greatest tektite aficionados of all time, was well-known for his belief that Muong Nong-type layered tektites held the keys to the kingdom of tektite mysteries, In his failing years, he sold off his world-class tektite collection in successive waves to help […]

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A New Sort of Australasian Tektite Teardrop

A New Sort of Australasian Tektite Teardrop

There is a class of Indochinite teardrops that are commonly termed “Hershey’s Kisses” out of morphological similarities to their namesake. Some of these exhibit most unusual twisted tails, and this was to be an article about “twisters”, but I learned something unexpected along the way. There is power in numbers, and as I gathered a […]

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Splatform Tektite Basal surface textures

Splatform Tektite Basal surface textures

Splashform tektites largely assumed their geometric form during aerodynamic flight, giving rise to a wide variety of dumbbells, teardrops, patties, spheroids, and similar forms. Amongst the splashforms, there is a subclass which I term “splatforms” which show deformation of primary shapes suggestive of having “splatted” against some hard surface while yet very plastic. In the […]

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Two splatted teardrops—-

Two splatted teardrops—-

I hope that this will not disappoint you, but we will not here debate just what they splatted on, but it was either against a cushion of speed-related compressed air or the earth’s surface. That they “splatted” is clear. These were once highly liquid blobs of glass shaped as classic teardrops that impacted, in this […]

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A Glass of Three Tales

A Glass of Three Tales

Trinitite. Edeowie glass. Daugistau glass (if you’ve ever heard of this last one, you are part of a very exclusive brotherhood indeed. This article may well be the first time this material has been discussed in any public venue). These three (there are others, but this is a tale of three glasses!) are all of […]

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A monument to Billitonites!

A monument to Billitonites!

Streets radiate from a focal roundabout at the city center of Belitung Island’s largest metropolis, Tanjung Pandan. Within this roundabout is a formal garden in the shape of a flower, and at its center is a pool ringed with jetting fountains. Rising from the pool are six massive tiled columns supporting a hexagonal platform slab […]

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Libyan Desert Glass Ventifacts.

Libyan Desert Glass Ventifacts.

There is as yet no clear consensus regarding the detailed origins of Libyan Desert Glass. What we do know is that 28.5 million years ago in what is now Egypt’s Western Desert, in the southern part of the country near the Libyan border, there was a significant encounter with a cosmic visitor. No crater is […]

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Telescoped Tektite Teardrops.

Telescoped Tektite Teardrops.

One of the more graphic Lei Gong Mo morphologies is the splatted or telescoped teardrop. The image above presents a developmental sequence (in side view) that nicely illustrates the concept without much need for verbiage. Years ago I proposed the term “splatform” for splashform tektites that show plastic impact (or flight) deformation and these telescoped […]

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Pseudotektites, a Tektite Teaser indeed!

Pseudotektites, a Tektite Teaser indeed!

There is a family of remarkably similar (and usually controversial) natural glasses, including, Saffordites (aka” Arizonaites”)Colombianites, Healdsburgites, and Philippine Amerikanites, which I term “pseudotektites”. Placed side by side with the real thing, these look very much like tektites, but they almost certainly are not. We are often approached by individuals that are convinced that they […]

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An Indochinite flow-nose!

An Indochinite flow-nose!

This is the third time I have tried to present this stone in the Tektite Teasers column. I just haven’t been able to do it justice. It is really hard to get a pleasing photograph of this complex piece. In describing the challenge of trying to capture the essence of this gem in a photograph, […]

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Moldavite Rain!

Moldavite Rain!

There are all sorts of collections, but a collection of like objects offers the simple pleasure of side-by-side comparison and contrast. It offers training in the range of variations on a theme, and it begs you to select your favorites. Collections are meant to be felt. We have been running low on Moldavite teardrops and […]

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Atacamaites, Central Atacama Desert, Chile

Atacamaites, Central Atacama Desert, Chile

In the last edition I mentioned the new Atacamaite impact glass and promised a follow-up story. Here it is (largely drawn from our website). A couple of years ago word started to leak out of Chile regarding a new “tektite strewn field” in the central Atacama Desert. We have recently had the chance to examine […]

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Aouelloul Glass, Adrar, Mauritania

Aouelloul Glass, Adrar, Mauritania

The recent announcement of “tektites” in the Atacama forced me to revisit the criteria that distinguish tektites from other impact glasses. At both extremes are examples where there is solid consensus. This one is a tektite, but that one isn’t. Somewhere in between is a poorly described definitional boundary. I don’t intend to fight that […]

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A complete Australite detached flange ring!

A complete Australite detached flange ring!

Flanged Australite buttons are perhaps the most coveted tektite morphology that exists, and they are, indeed, glorious things. But they have an occasional offspring that is much, much rarer: the detached flange ring. The majority of Australites appear to have started atmospheric re-entry as spheres, which were always thermally modified in subsequent gravitationally-accelerated flight. Flanges […]

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A Splashform Muong-Nong Tektite??? !

A Splashform Muong-Nong Tektite??? !

A couple of years ago, we picked out this unusual specimen while sorting through bulk Chinese tektites at the big Tucson show. It was only recently that I realized just how unusual it really is. A conspicuously layered tektite with unambiguous splash-form flight modifications??? This is an oxymoron. Most descriptions of Muong Nong-type tektites will […]

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