Pantar: The Sky is Falling. Really!

Pantar:

The Sky is Falling. Really!

Lets hope its not a bomb!

Pantar meteorite
 

Pantar, Philippines is an amazing meteorite. Not for its H5 class, the second most common type of chondrite after the oft-shunned L6. But instead Pantar has several wonderfully detailed descriptions about its 1938 fall and its travel from the island and into our collections.

The heavily crusted end section of Pantar in the author’s collection also contains a specimen number from the Jim DuPont collection adding history to its history.

The two stories below chronicle the fall of Pantar, and instantly launched Pantar to must-have status for serious collectors.


Pantar meteorite

Pantar meteorite

Pantar meteorite

Pantar meteorite

 

The activity within the matrix of Pantar is almost as busy as the global events surrounding its fall.

 

Pantar meteorite

Pantar meteorite

Pantar meteorite


 

Pantar meteorite


 

Pantar is an important reminder that a meteorite fall occurs somewhere at some time, and that place and space are forever part of the meteorite’s story. Some landing sites are somewhat benign to the story, but others such as with Pantar, are an essential element that sets this meteorite apart and far and above the average chondrite.

So as you add dates and locations to your collection, don’t forget to add the essence of the time and place as well. Because if you ignore the importance of the where and the when of the fall, the meteorite becomes, well, just a meteorite.

Until next time….


The Accretion Desk welcomes all comments and feedback. accretiondesk@gmail.com

About the Author

Martin Horejsi
Dr. Martin Horejsi is a Professor of Instructional Technology and Science Education at The University of Montana. A long-time meteorite collector and writer, before publishing his column The Accretion Desk in The Meteorite Times, he contributed often and wrote the column From The Strewnfields in Meteorite Magazine. Horejsi is currently a monthly columnist in The Science Teacher, a journal by the National Science Teachers Association. Horejsi specializes in the collection and study of historic witnessed fall meteorites with the older, smaller, and rarer the better. Although his meteorite collection once numbered over a thousand pieces with near that many different locations, several large trades and sales have streamlined the collection to about 250 locations with all but 10 being important witnessed falls. Many of the significant specimens in Horejsi's collection are historic witnessed falls that once occupied prominence in the meteorite collections of Robert A. Haag, James Schwade, and Michael Farmer. Other important specimens were acquired through institutional trades including those from The Smithsonian Institution, Arizona State University, and other universities.
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